Shorter School Week?

Hailey Torres

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4 days or 5?

                                              The sound of running against gravel and screaming kids was evident as students filtered through the Mount Juliet Middle school doors towards their buses and cars. 

It was Thursday, and as Briana Russel entered the crowded and smelly bus that took her to her house in the afternoon, she couldn’t help but wish that tomorrow didn’t exist.  

“I honestly, really wish we had 4 days of school instead of 5,”  she vented to her friends who were sitting in a seat behind her, 

“Why can’t this week be over? I’ve never been more tired in my life, I swear.” 

 

What Briana didn’t know however, is that she shared the same thoughts of many public officials and locals who live in school districts. 

For years, the concept of 4 day school-weeks has slowly become more popular as more people understand the benefits of this system of school, but is this really the right way to go? 

 

Many students would agree that a 4 day school-week is the right way to go, and the idea almost seems perfect- a permanent 3-day weekend, with extra time to do your work and more free time? It sounds like heaven. 

But, the 4 day school-week may not be the best option, Alisa Proctor says, “Of course I would like 4 day weeks instead of 5, but they (officials) might take away other free time for us in return for the 3 day weekends.”    

However, Briana Russel, the goalie for her soccer team, disagrees. “Having 4 day school-weeks would give me more time for practice and more opportunities for my team to play,” she said, “kids would also be able to spend more time with their families during the weekend and have more time at home to do school work.”

 

But what is better for the students- mentally?

It’s no lie to say that students are overworked, but it’s the youngest students that struggle. In the absence of a day, the average school day is added onto by an hour and a half, this can cause a problem in elementaries with younger kids who are not used to the change and need stability . 

Now, what about the older students who are middle school or up? The day less would likely improve mental health greatly. 

 

In the article, “What Students Are Saying About: Mental Health Days, Self-Doubt and Their Fashion Idols” an anonymous student stated, “As a sophomore who deals with severe depression and anxiety on a daily basis, I can assure everyone, STUDENTS NEED MENTAL HEALTH DAYS…stress has increased. If suicide/mental health issues have grown in recent times, why are we making it harder on students?” in response to the question: Should students have mental health days. 

A side effect of the day less would mean more chances for students to relax and take a day off for their mental health: this can be very helpful in students staying focused in school and performing better in class. 

 

The opinion on how many days a school-week should have will always mold differently, and as generations develop, the concept will face even more changes. In the end it all comes down to the question we started with: 4 days or 5?